AHS season 11 should use Red Tide’s best debunked theory

American Horror Story: Double Feature quickly debunked an enthralling fan theory, and it should be used in Season 11. Here’s what it is.

The first part of American Horror Story: Double functionality, Crimson Tide, was not what fans had come to expect from the series in terms of quality and themes, and so Season 11 should use Crimson Tidethe best theory debunked – here’s what it is. The horror genre is enjoying great success not only on the big screen but also on television, and the most popular television series of its genre continues to be american horror story, the anthology series created by Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk and premiered on FX in 2011.

Each season of american horror story tackles a different horror theme with different characters and events, although over time it has built a unified universe. The first season, retroactively titled Murder House, was all about a haunted house and the ghosts that lived there, and since then, american horror story explored a variety of themes, creatures, and places – from aliens to circuses and even cults. american horror story now has 10 seasons up for grabs, and its tenth season, titled Dual functionality, has been divided into two parts: Crimson Tide and Death Valley, with one by the sea and the other by the sand. Of course, there has been a lot of speculation about the Season 10 themes, especially after teasers and posters showed the aliens return, but the best theory around this season was quickly debunked.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Related: American Horror Story: Every Season’s Connection Explained

Crimson Tide is the seaside half, and it takes viewers to Provincetown, Massachusetts to follow writer Harry Gardner (Finn Wittrock), his wife Doris (Lily Rabe), and their daughter Alma (Ryan Kiera Armstrong). The city turns out to be plagued by pale creatures that feed on blood, and they transformed into those monsters after taking a black pill that would have enhanced their talents, but they didn’t have one. Harry becomes addicted to the pills and Alma begins taking them as well, sending the Gardner family on a downward spiral of lies and death. Before the premiere of Crimson Tide, it was strongly theorized that, as this is the part of the season fixed by the sea, that it would include mermaids, but this was quickly debunked – but it can be used in american horror story season 11.



American Horror Story Mermaids Alien Experiments

Mermaids (not to be confused with mermaids) are creatures from Greek mythology who lure nearby sailors with their music and sung voices to shipwreck on the coast of their island, so they are among the most dangerous creatures. that you may encounter at sea. The physical appearance of mermaids has been described as a combination of women and birds in different forms, and not only do they have haunting voices but are also believed to charm the winds so that their targets do not not escape. american horror story decided to use vampires again (as he had already done in Hotel) in Dual functionality/Crimson Tide, but Season 11 can easily pick mermaids as the main theme, especially since it was one of the main themes the audience voted for when Ryan Murphy polled potential themes on Twitter.


american horror story has already been renewed for three more seasons, and there are still plenty of horror themes that can be addressed in the series, but given the disappointment of Crimson Tide and the excitement around the possibility of mermaids appearing, the best option for season 11 would definitely be these dangerous and fascinating sea creatures. Sure, american horror story would give the mermaids a twist to better suit the style of the show and make it as believable as possible, which only makes the idea more exciting.

Next: AHS Season 10 True Story: President Eisenhower’s Link To Aliens Explained



We are the ones who secretly revealed why Kate and Toby broke up

We are the ones who just secretly revealed why Kate and Toby are going to separate


About the Author


Source link

Comments are closed.