Scientific context – Templo Do Conhecimento http://templodoconhecimento.com/ Wed, 05 May 2021 02:59:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://templodoconhecimento.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/cropped-icon-32x32.png Scientific context – Templo Do Conhecimento http://templodoconhecimento.com/ 32 32 Vancouver ER doctor writes medical thriller about fear and misinformation surrounding anti-vaccine movement https://templodoconhecimento.com/vancouver-er-doctor-writes-medical-thriller-about-fear-and-misinformation-surrounding-anti-vaccine-movement/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/vancouver-er-doctor-writes-medical-thriller-about-fear-and-misinformation-surrounding-anti-vaccine-movement/#respond Tue, 04 May 2021 23:48:47 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/vancouver-er-doctor-writes-medical-thriller-about-fear-and-misinformation-surrounding-anti-vaccine-movement/ Daniel Kalla finished his last book on vaccine reluctance and misinformation the day he learned about COVID-19. “Now that’s the hot button problem and arguably the biggest problem the world is facing right now,” he said. First edition guest host Michelle Eliot. His book, Immunity lost, comes out on Tuesday, shortly after the first anniversary […]]]>

Daniel Kalla finished his last book on vaccine reluctance and misinformation the day he learned about COVID-19.

“Now that’s the hot button problem and arguably the biggest problem the world is facing right now,” he said. First edition guest host Michelle Eliot.

His book, Immunity lost, comes out on Tuesday, shortly after the first anniversary of the declaration of a global pandemic and as people around the world are vaccinated against the virus.

The book focuses on a dangerous bacteria causing deadly epidemics around the world and a local public health official asking a pharmaceutical company working on a vaccine to release it early.

Vancouver emergency physician and bestselling author Kalla said it carried an important message to him.

“I knew vaccine and vaccine reluctance would be a big deal before COVID,” he said.

“It’s a very pro-vaccine book and an uplifting tale of vaccine reluctance, but I’m not trying to vilify vaccine reluctance.”

He said people who are hesitant about vaccines range from those who are unsure of certain vaccines to people who are “zealous” about the anti-vaccine movement.

The hesitation about vaccines is nothing new. In the photo above, members of Vaccine Choice Canada, a group launching a legal challenge to Ontario’s childhood immunization system, hold a rally at the Provincial Legislature on October 29, 2019. (Evan Mitsui / CBC)

One of the main characters in his story is a naturopath whose son is autistic, for whom he blames the measles vaccine.

“It allows me to get into the history of the anti-vax movement and what drives it,” Kalla said.

“For some of them it has become a religion. It really is not based on science. And unfortunately it poses a risk to them and to all of us. It is not just like smoking or other habits that can affect people personally. You know, Anti-vax can unfortunately have an impact on the whole of society. ”

He admits that his message won’t reach everyone, but understands why some people are reluctant to get a new drug injection.

A health worker administers a vaccine on Vancouver Island at a clinic in January 2021. (Shawn Wagar / Island Health)

However, he stresses how important it is that everyone who can get vaccinated is vaccinated.

“MRNA vaccines like Pfizer have been given to hundreds of millions of people with virtually no side effects. It is one of the safest drugs we know of and it is incredibly effective, ”Kalla said.

“It is our societal obligation to be vaccinated.”

Thriller genre “ perfect vehicle ” to share a scientific message

Kalla’s work specializes in topical, often controversial medical issues, including The last summit, published last year, which looks at the opioid crisis.

As a child, Kalla read books by James Michener and Michael Crichton to give her science and history context. Using the thriller genre as a way to share scientific facts came naturally to him.

“It seems like the perfect way to get a message across without being preachy and too dry,” he said.

An Ontario Medical Association advertisement aimed at addressing the general reluctance to immunize is pictured in a bus shelter. (Paul Smith / CBC)

When he met his editors two years ago, he felt that vaccination was the perfect fit for a thriller.

“I know this problem will never go away,” he said.

“Vaccination is one of the greatest medical miracles of modern times. Yet there is no other medical advance that has spawned so many myths, hysteria and passion.”

Listen to Daniel Kalla’s interview on The Early Edition here:

The first edition8:28Vancouver doctor writes new book that reflects our current situation

Author Dr. Daniel Kalla talks with Michelle Eliot about her new book “Lost Immunity”. 8:28

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Domino Data Lab and MathWorks Partner to Improve MATLAB and Simulink Cloud Offerings https://templodoconhecimento.com/domino-data-lab-and-mathworks-partner-to-improve-matlab-and-simulink-cloud-offerings/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/domino-data-lab-and-mathworks-partner-to-improve-matlab-and-simulink-cloud-offerings/#respond Tue, 04 May 2021 14:04:26 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/domino-data-lab-and-mathworks-partner-to-improve-matlab-and-simulink-cloud-offerings/ Joint solution enables scientists and engineers with scalable infrastructure and shared knowledge to accelerate model research and development SAN FRANCISCO – (BUSINESS WIRE) –Domino Data Lab, provider of the leading Enterprise MLOps platform trusted by over 20% of Fortune 100 companies, today announced at MATLAB EXPO a partnership and joint solution allowing an accelerated development […]]]>


Joint solution enables scientists and engineers with scalable infrastructure and shared knowledge to accelerate model research and development

SAN FRANCISCO – (BUSINESS WIRE) –Domino Data Lab, provider of the leading Enterprise MLOps platform trusted by over 20% of Fortune 100 companies, today announced at MATLAB EXPO a partnership and joint solution allowing an accelerated development of models in MATLAB® and Simulink®, the world’s simplest and most productive scientific and engineering design environment from MathWorks.

This joint solution, based on newly extended integrations, gives users access to powerful and scalable cloud resources for a modern, web-first data science experience, to avoid the limitations of desktop or computer hardware. ” use a remote desktop to reach a shared server. IT teams have greater control over compute usage and cost optimization by dramatically reducing the footprint where MATLAB and Simulink are installed.

In the Domino environment, research teams also benefit from full reproducibility, collaboration, and visibility across multiple MATLAB and Simulink projects, regardless of tools and versions.

“This integration enables users of one of the most popular engineering and scientific research languages ​​to collaborate seamlessly with other data scientists and open up exciting opportunities for groundbreaking research,” said Nick Elprin , CEO and co-founder of Domino Data Lab. “With native support for MATLAB by Domino, engineers and scientists are detached from their desktops, allowing better visibility over the entire project lifecycle and access to scalable calculations at Requirement. This ultimately results in more accurate results at a faster rate. ”

“As more and more of our customers move their data science processes and projects to the cloud, it becomes imperative for them to effectively scale their repeatability and automation capabilities in an open environment,” said Diego Volkenandt , Head of Product Management at GTS data processing, which relies on both Domino and MATLAB as part of its DSready Cloud offering. “Domino’s Enterprise MLOps platform integrates seamlessly with MATLAB and Simulink, enabling our DSready Cloud customers to standardize and scale data science operations across teams, processes, technologies and, in turn, ultimately, their activities. ”

Even the basic challenges of scaling data science can hamper the progress of research and development of models that optimize engineering and business processes. Using MATLAB and Simulink in Domino, teams can:

  • Speed ​​up model development: By moving MATLAB from the desktop to cloud or on-premises resources on Domino, engineers and scientists can accelerate training using powerful GPUs – including NVIDIA DGX GPUs for deep learning applications – as well as large memory machines, and also run MATLAB jobs in parallel. next to.
  • Gain visibility throughout the data science lifecycle: MATLAB on Domino enables data science teams to manage the entire model development lifecycle – creating a single place to find all data, code, and research in one place.
  • Access different versions of MATLAB on Domino Workbench: Teams can create a project and verify code using multiple versions of MATLAB, then compare results, performance, and validate against regulatory requirements, all without slowing down the search or use of the model in the field. .
  • Run simulations on rugged hardware: Simulink on Domino streamlines access to large volumes of input data and leverages multi-core workspaces, running massive simulations in parallel.
  • Optimize IT costs: Eliminate the need to purchase expensive, underutilized desktops by accessing scalable compute with on-demand shared resources in the data center or in the cloud, consumed only when needed, then recovered automatically.

“MathWorks provides a comprehensive platform for solving AI challenges based on decades of supporting complex engineering projects. We give engineers a different AI experience by helping them create better AI datasets, tackle integration challenges, reduce risk, and continuously test AI models in context system-wide, ”said Roy Lurie, vice president of engineering for MATLAB products, MathWorks. “Our collaboration with Domino gives data science teams a simplified way to access cloud resources to meet the challenge of accelerating research while managing budgets.”

Additional Resources

About Domino Data Lab

Domino Data Lab powers model-driven businesses with its industry-leading Enterprise MLOps platform that accelerates the development and deployment of data science work while increasing collaboration and governance. Over 20% of Fortune 100 companies rely on Domino to advance data science and make it a competitive advantage. Founded in 2013, Domino is backed by Sequoia Capital and other leading investors. For more information visit dominodatalab.com.

About MathWorks

MathWorks is the leading developer of mathematical calculation software. MATLAB, the language of engineers and scientists, is a programming environment for algorithm development, data analysis, visualization, and numerical computation. Simulink is a block diagram environment for simulation and model-based design of multi-domain and embedded engineering systems. Engineers and scientists around the world are using these product families to accelerate the pace of discovery, innovation and development in the automotive, aerospace, electronics, financial, biotechnology and pharmaceutical services. MATLAB and Simulink are also foundational teaching and research tools at universities and educational institutions around the world. Founded in 1984, MathWorks employs more than 5,000 people in 16 countries, with its headquarters in Natick, Massachusetts, United States. For more information visit mathworks.com.

Contacts

Michael diamond

Aircover PR

Domino@aircoverpr.com



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How to read a Covid-19 test report: What is the Ct value? https://templodoconhecimento.com/how-to-read-a-covid-19-test-report-what-is-the-ct-value/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/how-to-read-a-covid-19-test-report-what-is-the-ct-value/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 01:18:32 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/how-to-read-a-covid-19-test-report-what-is-the-ct-value/ Among the various scientific terms that the Covid-19 pandemic has been part of the public vocabulary, one is the “ Ct value ” in RT-PCR tests to determine if a patient is positive for Covid-19. This was the subject of a recent request by the government of Maharashtra to the Indian Council for Medical Research […]]]>


Among the various scientific terms that the Covid-19 pandemic has been part of the public vocabulary, one is the “ Ct value ” in RT-PCR tests to determine if a patient is positive for Covid-19.

This was the subject of a recent request by the government of Maharashtra to the Indian Council for Medical Research (ICMR). The state has requested clarification on whether to treat a person as Covid-negative if the Ct value is greater than 24 and the person is asymptomatic. State officials said that various ICMR documents mentioned different Ct values ​​and that there were divergent views even between Niti Aayog and the National Center for Disease Control.

A few days later, the ICMR CEO responded to the Secretary of State for Health that the ICMR had taken input from virology labs across the country to arrive at a single Ct threshold. All patients with a Ct value less than 35 can be considered positive while those with a Ct value greater than 35 can be considered negative, the ICMR said.

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But what is the Ct value?

Short for cycle threshold, Ct is a value that emerges during RT-PCR testing, the gold standard for detection of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. In an RT-PCR test, RNA is extracted from the swab taken from the patient. It is then converted into DNA, which is then amplified. Amplification refers to the process of creating multiple copies of genetic material – in this case, DNA. This improves the test’s ability to detect the presence of viruses. Amplification occurs through a series of cycles – one copy becomes two, two becomes four, and so on – and it is after several cycles that a detectable amount of virus is produced.

According to the ICMR opinion, the Ct value of an RT-PCR reaction is the number of cycles at which fluorescence of the PCR product is detectable above the background signal. Simply put, the Ct value refers to the number of cycles after which the virus can be detected. If a higher number of cycles is required, it means that the virus was not detected when the number of cycles was lower. The lower the Ct value, the higher the viral load – because the virus was spotted after fewer cycles.

Why is this important?

To put this in context, let’s look at the ICMR opinion and the Maharashtra letter to the ICMR. According to the ICMR, a patient is considered positive for Covid if the Ct value is less than 35. In other words, if the virus is detectable after 35 cycles or earlier, then the patient is considered positive. If the benchmark were lowered to 24 – the value mentioned in the letter from Maharashtra – it would mean that Ct values ​​between 25 and 34 would not be considered positive. A benchmark of 35, therefore, means that more patients would be considered positive than we would get if the benchmark were 24. ICMR said lowering the Ct cutoff parameter could lead to the disappearance of Ct. several infectious people.

One can think of the Ct value as a measure of the potential for transmission, said lead virologist Dr Shahid Jameel. “So if there is more virus in my throat and nose, I will transmit it better,” said Dr Jameel, director of the Trivedi School of Biosciences at Ashoka University.

What is the significance of the ICMR threshold of 35?

Overall, the accepted cut-off value for the Ct value for Covid-19 varies between 35 and 40, depending on the instructions of the respective manufacturers of the test equipment. The ICMR arrived at the Ct value of 35 based on laboratory experiments and inputs from several virology laboratories.

There was no new notice, but the ICMR has informed the government of Maharashtra that it is not advisable to use a lower cycle threshold setting as it will lead to the disappearance of several infectious people and increase transmission of the disease, said Dr Balram Bhargava, CEO of ICMR.

Is there a correlation between a Ct value and the severity of the disease?

No. Although the Ct value is inversely correlated with viral load, it does not affect the severity of the disease, the experts said. A patient may have a low Ct value, which means her viral load is high enough to be detected quickly, but she may still be asymptomatic.

A small study published in the Indian Journal of Medical Microbiology in January of this year found that there was no correlation between Ct values ​​and disease severity or mortality in patients with Covid disease. -19. He found that the time since symptom onset has a stronger relationship with Ct values ​​relative to disease severity.

The Ct value tells us about the viral load in the throat, not the lungs, said Dr Parikshit Prayag, consultant for infectious diseases at Deenanath Mangeshkar Hospital in Pune. “The Ct value does not correlate with severity – only with infectivity. In the first report, I don’t really look at the Ct value, but for patient follow-up in the hospital, I consider the Ct value, because then I can decide whether or not to transfer the patient to the non-Covid building. . From an infectivity perspective, it may matter, not severity, ”said Dr Prayag.

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Does a high Ct value always mean a low viral load?

While this may be the obvious conclusion, some experts point out that some patients may have a high Ct value while having a very high level of Covid-19 infection, and vice versa. Many factors are important in interpreting an RT-PCR test, and the results may also depend on the method of specimen collection and the time between infection and collection and analysis.

An ICMR notice in August last year noted that Ct values ​​depend on how the sample was collected. A poorly collected sample may reflect inappropriate Ct values. In addition, Ct values ​​are also determined by the technical competence of the person performing the test, the calibration of the equipment and the analytical skills of the interpreters.

Again, Ct values ​​may differ between nasal and oropharyngeal samples taken from the same individual. Transport temperature, as well as the time between collection and reception in the laboratory, can also have a negative impact on Ct values.



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Lateral flow test beyond COVID-19 https://templodoconhecimento.com/lateral-flow-test-beyond-covid-19/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/lateral-flow-test-beyond-covid-19/#respond Wed, 28 Apr 2021 00:01:16 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/lateral-flow-test-beyond-covid-19/ Before 2020, the words “lateral flow” didn’t mean much to anyone outside of the scientific community. When talking to people unfamiliar with lateral flow, those working with the tech should often use the home pregnancy test example as a shortcut. Now, thanks to COVID-19, lateral flow is no longer an unknown – as we can […]]]>


Before 2020, the words “lateral flow” didn’t mean much to anyone outside of the scientific community. When talking to people unfamiliar with lateral flow, those working with the tech should often use the home pregnancy test example as a shortcut. Now, thanks to COVID-19, lateral flow is no longer an unknown – as we can see on google trends, the term entered the public consciousness. This is because rapid lateral flow tests are used by governments and health authorities around the world to screen large numbers of people who do not show symptoms of COVID-19.

In the UK, the government said regular rapid tests using lateral flow tests would be “fundamental” helping to prevent future epidemics. England has had a mass testing system in place since March, and now people are being encouraged to take two tests per week to help keep COVID-19 infection rates low.

It is positive that governments and health agencies are seeing regular lateral flow testing as a way out of this pandemic and back to normal. But more than that, it’s also a vital part of resuming our health systems – a way to help alleviate some of the enormous burdens COVID-19 has placed on hospitals and those who work there. Likewise, schools, colleges, universities, and nursing homes use lateral flow to safely reopen.

What about the future? Where does the technology go from here?


COVID-19[female[femininewill not be the last pandemic we see in our life, so the lateral flow should be seen as the common method of rapid screening for a wide range of large-scale infectious diseases, such as HIV, Ebola, malaria, Zika virus and influenza variants.

But apart from infectious diseases, lateral flow can also bring affordable diagnostics to large numbers of people, opening up and democratizing healthcare around the world. Now the benefits are more widely known – affordability, portability, accuracy and speed – there is a huge opportunity for test developers and manufacturers to really push for wider adoption of the technology.

Why not give people access to a range of quick, affordable, and accurate tests they can do at home so they can screen themselves for a variety of health issues? By doing this, we can reduce the number of people who become patients, further reducing the burden on health systems.

Lateral flow has the potential to be a part of everyday life. In addition to home pregnancy and fertility tests, people can test themselves for sexually transmitted diseases, vitamin D deficiency, food allergens, high cholesterol, or cardiac markers that could indicate heart disease. Every home test saves public money and allows people to monitor their own health and well-being. And it’s not just human health that lateral flow can impact. The technology is already widely used to detect disease in animals – domestic and livestock – in the area of ​​food safety – to test for pathogens and food-borne contaminants – and in environmental testing – soil, water and air.

However, there is still a reputation issue to overcome.


Of course, many people are still unsure of the benefits of lateral flow. For the technology to reach its full potential, this will need to be addressed. Negative reports of how lateral flow was used in the pandemic haven’t helped.

When mass testing for COVID-19 was introduced in Liverpool, England last year, researchers carried out a study by comparing it to the “gold standard” PCR (polymerase chain reaction) test. Of the 5,869 people who took both a lateral flow test and a PCR test, 70 were positive on the PCR test, but of those 70, only 28 were positive on the lateral flow test – 40%.

This led to criticism of the program and negative headlines on Lateral Flow – ignoring the fact that the program lowers the number of cases. But this study largely misses the point: rapid mass screening is the best solution to quickly screen large numbers of asymptomatic people. Context is essential. Lateral flow is the only viable option when large-scale monitoring, rapid response, and results with rapid data are required.

Digitization is a solution to improve lateral flow capabilities


Introducing digital connectivity and data collection is a win-win solution – it can add tremendous value to lateral flow testing and help overcome the perception that the technology is old and basic. When the tests are scanned, the results and additional data collected by a user-friendly mobile app, sent to the cloud, and securely stored for future analysis, they become extremely powerful in providing a complete picture of the situation. Without the data, we are stealing blind.

Globally, such a system can be used by governments to monitor infectious diseases and identify epidemic hot spots, allowing medical interventions to be targeted with greater precision. But it would also be of great value to many organizations and businesses, allowing them to reopen and continue to operate safely. For example, airlines or cruise ships could test passengers before boarding, ensuring a safer journey. The data collected makes testing even more valuable, giving a comprehensive profile of each individual tested – their age, gender, underlying conditions and symptoms all gathered at the time of testing – as well as a global monitoring of millions of results. of tests.

The diagnostics industry must react positively


So the lateral flow is here to stay. It has passed the home pregnancy test stage in the public eye and has truly proven its worth in the pandemic. As an industry, we need to seize this opportunity and keep lateral flow at the forefront. We must redouble our efforts to make it an efficient and affordable diagnostic solution. And we need to keep innovating, finding new uses for lateral flow and combining it with the latest technologies to make it even more valuable.

About the Author:

Phil Groom is Commercial Director of Digital Health Bond, a global medical technology company that develops application and cloud technology solutions for lateral flow diagnostics.



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Could the coronavirus be the prescription our exam fever needs? https://templodoconhecimento.com/could-the-coronavirus-be-the-prescription-our-exam-fever-needs/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/could-the-coronavirus-be-the-prescription-our-exam-fever-needs/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 23:00:18 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/could-the-coronavirus-be-the-prescription-our-exam-fever-needs/ With the aggressive return of COVID-19, we experience increased anxiety. And in the midst of this turmoil, we are also witnessing the collapse of “normalcy” in our education system. As school board exams are canceled or postponed across the country, students, parents and teachers are at a loss. Perhaps many of them, conditioned to believe […]]]>


With the aggressive return of COVID-19, we experience increased anxiety. And in the midst of this turmoil, we are also witnessing the collapse of “normalcy” in our education system. As school board exams are canceled or postponed across the country, students, parents and teachers are at a loss. Perhaps many of them, conditioned to believe that education is incomplete without standardized tests or exams, fear that these young students, outside of the mental agony of the pandemic, will miss what this hyper-society. competitive needs: willpower or endurance. to participate in this exam war, accept the logic of classification, classification and prioritization, or the duality of “success” and “failure”.

However, this rupture of “normality” must make us introspect and ask worrying questions: can the ritualization of standardized tests and exams be considered as the ultimate substance of education? Or is there more to a learner’s life than the technique of learning exam strategy, or the competitive urge to be declared a “top”? Paradoxically, at this time of deep existential crisis, this question has acquired a meaning. It is in this context that three questions must be raised.

To begin with, let’s be clear that these standardized tests or exams are by no means neutral. It doesn’t take much political-cultural acumen to realize that a child from a municipal school located in the Trilokpuri slum in Delhi and a child from a luxury “international” school in Bangalore is by no means equal, even if both are necessary. master the same texts, assimilate knowledge into the same official program regardless of diverse and asymmetric socio-cultural contexts, and pass the same CBSE exam. With a huge difference in their access to social / cultural / economic capital, their performance is bound to be different. And we cannot hide the story of this perpetual reproduction of social inequalities through the so-called neutral and uniform exams simply because, sometimes, the child of a rickshaw puller or a street vendor gets 90%. , and his photo is published in the newspapers. Moreover, the absurdity of these ‘neutral’ exams becomes clear when we examine the digital divide in the country, and accept that the high profile ‘online’ teaching / learning is a myth and has done an injustice to those who do not. can’t afford it. Do these tests exist only to eliminate people, choose elected officials, enhance their “success stories” and, in the name of “meritocracy”, sanctify the logic of an inconsiderately divided society?

Second, it’s important to deconstruct our scholarly mind and realize that the kind of exams we experience are by no means the stuff of meaningful education. Instead, the ritualization and tyranny of exams causes immense psychic anxiety, generates widespread fear, and most importantly, robs the entire learning / unlearning / exploring experience of a sense of joy, wonder, and happiness. self-discovery. Instead, they turn one into a smart strategist; one is trained (by coaching centers as well as teachers obsessed with their students’ exam performance) to master the technique of giving the “right” answer. Therefore, each subject is reduced to a set of exam puzzles. Rarely do you find the time and space to, say, read a Premchand story at your own pace, or watch the sunset and explore the scientific reasons for the amazing color of the sky, or do things with its hands and feel the integration of the mind and the physical. Instead, the one-sided focus on exam performance kills the very spirit of learning as self-exploration.

Third, this exam-oriented education breeds fear, envy, and the superiority / inferiority complex. In a way, it legitimizes hyper-competitiveness as a way of life; it is inherently contrary to the spirit of reciprocity, symmetry and cooperation. Therefore, its “hit” products – the group of “high end” and “gold medalists” – tend to be selfish. The art of relationship, humility, the ethics of sharing, and trust in the innate possibility and uniqueness of every human soul – we do not allow our children to develop these qualities. Instead, schools orient them to become warriors. It would not be entirely wrong to say that the kind of examinations we have taken for granted are the worst form of violence we inflict on the conscience of young children.

Isn’t this also the moment when the coronavirus forced us to rethink our lifestyles, and therefore the very meaning of education? Feel the intensity of the pain and agony that we are going through. Feel the emptiness of what our bloated egos take for granted – our superiority, almost a sense of immortality. Feel the trauma of insignificance as we are reduced to numbers. Death becomes mere statistics and living is just a survival strategy with masks, disinfectants and vaccines. Feel the pervasive fear and loneliness that surrounds our existence when crematoriums are chaotic and hospitals are unmanageable. Education must sensitize our children, make them humble wanderers, activate their patience and endurance, cultivate the ethics of caring and prepare them to come through life with songs of collective redemption. No harm will be done if standardized tests and exams do not quantify their performance in algebra and geometry. And we won’t fall if TV stations don’t have the opportunity to interview the “high end” amid the suicidal tales of those who “fail”.

When do we realize that our children need something truly stimulating and life-affirming rather than the neurosis of exam-centric education?

Pathak is professor of sociology at JNU



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Movie Review: ‘In the Earth’ https://templodoconhecimento.com/movie-review-in-the-earth/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/movie-review-in-the-earth/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 22:35:49 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/movie-review-in-the-earth/ Christopher lewis April 27, 2021 – 2:34 PM Ben Wheatley’s In the ground is not the first film inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic and it certainly won’t be the last, but it is in a privileged position as one of the first horror films to explore the effects of the global pandemic deadly while we […]]]>


Movie Review: 'In the Earth'

Ben Wheatley’s In the ground is not the first film inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic and it certainly won’t be the last, but it is in a privileged position as one of the first horror films to explore the effects of the global pandemic deadly while we are still experiencing it. More than just an exploitative attempt to strike while the cultural benchmark is still hot, the story uses the context of a virulent disease as a springboard to probe the depths of insanity that people can be driven to in their research. erroneous remedy. Weaving together standard horror tropes, pseudo-science and folktales, In the ground takes an overall moment and distills it on a personal level as four people walk through the woods and test exactly the graphic abuse that a single human foot can endure.

Scientist Martin Lowery (Joel Fry) is sent to a small park that has been converted into a government research station. Alongside ranger Alma (Ellora Torchia), he sets out in search of a remote camp where Dr. Wendel (Hayley Squires) is experimenting in the hopes of finding the source of a deadly virus. Already the worst nightmare of the millennium, Dr. Wendel’s base can only be reached by walking for several days through a densely wooded forest with no cell reception and eerie nighttime soundscapes reminiscent of a tortured ostrich. A few days after the start of their trip, the couple are assaulted by an invisible character who beats them mercilessly and steals their shoes. They do their best to persevere, but it doesn’t take long before Martin cuts his foot so badly that he’s barely able to stand.

Fortunately, they stumble upon a reclusive camper named Zach (Reece Shearsmith) who leads them to a tarp covered “workshop” that almost certainly led an old life of a weed nursery, where he offers them all kinds of hospitality, including included cool shoes, drinks, and even surgery without anesthesia for Martin’s foot. Sadly, it turns out that the drinks are fortified, and Zach does little to dissuade the impression that he might be Robert Plant and Billy Connolly’s child-loving child by choosing the most socially inappropriate time to release a guitar so that he can put his victims to sleep. a good kidnapping stupor. Once they’re completely drugged and tied up, Zach sets out to make things even more uncomfortable by dressing his new friends in makeshift tarp outfits and laying their corpse-like bodies on the floor for a series of photos. spooky insta aimed at appeasing an invisible forest. spirit named Parnag Fegg. Martin and Alma eventually manage to break free, but not before Zach uses an ax to perform a more impromptu surgery on Martin’s foot.

Unusually enough for a horror movie, it wasn’t until the duo escaped the ax maniac that things started to get really weird. When they manage to find Dr. Wendel, she has filled the woods with a surround sound setup generating eerie tones as part of a “science” experiment based on instructions she found carved into a rock. She also drops the bombshell that Zach is her ex-husband before demonstrating the family resemblance by carrying out her own unwanted surgery at Zach’s feet. While much of their time spent with Dr Wendel is spent in tedious exhibition, the story manages to capture energy, if not consistency, as it turns into a series of frenzied edits on nature which end up becoming something that vaguely resembles a satisfactory conclusion.

Verdict: 3 out of 5 stars

There are many things to love In the ground. The film offers a truly interesting take on the prevailing zeitgeist of the early 2020s by using the context of the pandemic to explore the extremes of human behavior. Clint Mansell’s heavy synth score is as beautifully overwhelming as Shearsmith’s performance as the deranged Zach, and cinematographer Nick Gillespie does a masterful job of capturing the desolate humidity of the isolated setting. Still, the pace falters pretty badly in the third act, and the supernatural element feels a bit too convoluted and alien to be fully satisfying. Fans of Blood will be disappointed with the parsimony with which it is used, while the more fussy will be disappointed with the gruesome way Martin’s continued foot trauma is portrayed. But despite its flaws, the film is a nice enough mix of spooky vibe and stylized sensory overload to keep your eyes fixed firmly on the screen – except, of course, for the handful of largely orthopedic moments that will require you to cover them.


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Penn Museum apologizes for ‘unethical possession of human remains’: NPR https://templodoconhecimento.com/penn-museum-apologizes-for-unethical-possession-of-human-remains-npr/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/penn-museum-apologizes-for-unethical-possession-of-human-remains-npr/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 20:07:00 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/penn-museum-apologizes-for-unethical-possession-of-human-remains-npr/ MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: Dr Samuel Morton collected skulls, over 900 of them. He was a scientist in Philadelphia in the early 1800s. Morton has claimed that his studies of skulls make a case for white supremacy. He is now considered the father of scientific racism and his work is no longer accepted. But his […]]]>




MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Dr Samuel Morton collected skulls, over 900 of them. He was a scientist in Philadelphia in the early 1800s. Morton has claimed that his studies of skulls make a case for white supremacy. He is now considered the father of scientific racism and his work is no longer accepted. But his collection of skulls remains in the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology. From member station WHYY, Peter Crimmins reports that the Penn Museum is trying to bring them back to their place.

PETER CRIMMINS, BYLINE: Dr Samuel Morton was measuring the cranial cavity of skulls, the part where the brain is located, by filling them with peppercorns, then taking the seeds and measuring their volume. He believed that a larger cranial cavity indicated greater intelligence and wrote in his 1839 book “Crania Americana” that whites were superior to other races.

Today, brain size is not considered evidence of superior intelligence, and Morton’s racist conclusions are not accepted by the scientific community. The problem is how Morton acquired the skulls, mostly from grave robbers. Paul Wolff Mitchell, a PhD candidate in anthropology at Penn, said about a dozen were said to have been dug in a pottery field in Philadelphia, where poor African Americans were buried. More than 50 others were exhumed from an African slave cemetery in Cuba.

PAUL WOLFF MITCHELL: It wasn’t just – not by consensus. They were, in many cases, violently acquired, burgled, recovered on the battlefields, taken from gallows across the world.

CRIMMINS: When activist Abdul-Aliy Muhammad learned of the collection’s existence two years ago, he felt it in his own bones.

ABDUL-ALIY MUHAMMAD: My body was hot. My heart was pounding. I was really angry, really angry to know this information.

CRIMMINS: Muhammad and Mitchell request that the skulls be repatriated from the Penn Museum, which has held them since the 1960s. As one of the largest collections of historic human skulls in America, the Morton Collection has been used by modern scholars to study more benign things, such as the effects of diet and disease on anatomy. Until last year, the collection was on display in an anthropology room. Museum director Christopher Woods said after the skulls were removed from view last summer, a committee was formed to resolve the issue with the Morton collection.

CHRISTOPHER WOODS: It was sparked by everything that was going on in the country in 2020 – the murder of George Floyd, the rise of Black Lives Matter.

CRIMMINS: Last week, after eight months of internal discussions, the Penn Museum publicly apologized for the unethical possession of Morton’s skulls and presented a plan to repatriate them, using the Native American Graves as a model. and Repatriation Act. But unlike Native American remains, often associated with a known tribe, these skulls are cut off from their own history. Take the example of a skull of an African slave in Cuba. The rest of the skeleton is still buried in Cuba. But while this person was alive, he was stolen from Africa, so where does the skull go?

WOODS: Each case is an individual case – isn’t it? – which has its own context, its own complications. But, you know, it’s so important that this work is done as carefully as possible and that we really understand what the downline communities want.

CRIMMINS: Woods forms a new committee at the Penn Museum that will identify and consult with communities that can claim a skull. Some activists say the plan does not go far enough, requiring community members not only to be consulted, but to sit on the committee and have a direct voice on how to lay these bones with dignity.

For NPR News, I’m Peter Crimmins.

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New flexible research framework can improve reproducibility and transparency https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-flexible-research-framework-can-improve-reproducibility-and-transparency/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-flexible-research-framework-can-improve-reproducibility-and-transparency/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 19:54:08 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-flexible-research-framework-can-improve-reproducibility-and-transparency/ Woohoo – you’ve finally submitted the article you’ve worked on for years to your favorite peer-reviewed journal. Three months later, you receive a rejection letter, not for the content, but because you have not provided the required guarantees. But wait, you don’t need to provide this to the last journal you submitted work to, or […]]]>


Woohoo – you’ve finally submitted the article you’ve worked on for years to your favorite peer-reviewed journal. Three months later, you receive a rejection letter, not for the content, but because you have not provided the required guarantees. But wait, you don’t need to provide this to the last journal you submitted work to, or the one before … so why does this one need it?

Since there is no standard publication framework, different journals have different guidelines. There are existing guidelines, but these are often specialized standards like ARRIVE, which covers animal research, and CONSORT, which is associated with clinical trial notification. This has led to a fragmented scientific publishing landscape that has increased the burden on authors and publishers.

Working with six renowned journals, a team from the University of Edinburgh and the Center for Open Science has developed a new framework that they believe will harmonize the recording of results and improve reproducibility, replication and transparency in results. life sciences. The new MDAR (Research Materials, Design, Analysis and Reporting) framework is presented in a new publication in PNAS.

“Improving research is a challenge; it requires continuous effort, adapting to the changing demands and circumstances of the times, ”said Malcolm Macleod, study author and academic leader for research improvement and research integrity. research at the University of Edinburgh. sufficient, but we hope that the MDAR framework can contribute to the range of initiatives [that] support improvement. “

The heart of the framework is its flexibility and ease of adoption. In its current structure, MDAR has three separate outputs. The framework itself sets out minimum requirements and best practice recommendations in the four key areas that make up its name. The optional checklist helps operationalize the framework by serving as an implementation tool to help authors comply with journal policies and editors and reviewers assess reporting and adherence to the standard. Finally, the development document is a user guide that provides context for the framework.

“In many ways, the MDAR framework is a joint iteration of our collective previous experience with guidelines, checklists and editorial requirements towards a harmonized and practical guideline for minimum reporting requirements,” explain the researchers in their article.

To gain valuable feedback on the MDAR checklist and ensure its practicality, the team piloted the framework in 13 journals and 289 manuscripts. According to the article, 80% of the 211 matching authors who responded to the team’s survey found the checklist “very” or “somewhat” helpful. Similarly, 84% of the 33 writers who participated in the pilot also found the checklist “very” or “somewhat” useful.

An important takeaway from the pilot program was that only 15 of the 42 checklist items were considered relevant for more than half of the 289 manuscripts. While study participants suggested organizing the checklist in a nested fashion to allow users to easily skip irrelevant sections, the authors concluded on a different approach given their emphasis on flexibility. The team said they have decided that “the best organization could be journal specific” and will leave the option as an implementation decision for journals that choose to use the checklist.

Also in the name of flexibility, the research team opted for three increasingly stringent implementation levels for journals – the recommended term, the limited term, and the full term.

While the ultimate goal is to report transparently in journals to improve research, the team envisions the MDAR framework being used by other stakeholders in the life science community. They hypothesize that it could be used by researchers to design, conduct, analyze and report studies; by institutions to teach best research practices; and by funders and others involved in research evaluation to help assess rigor and reporting.

Finally, the tool has the potential to be particularly impactful in the ever-growing field of scientific pre-impressions.

“With the growth of pre-prints in recent years, pre-print servers are ideally placed to collect (and publish) an MDAR checklist completed by the author, who could then travel with the manuscript when submitted. to a journal, ”write the authors.

The full set of MDAR resources is available in a collection on the Open science framework. The authors say it will be maintained and updated as a community resource, evolving further over time and implementation rates increase.

“We have identified a basic minimum requirement as well as an ambitious set of best practices that provide guidance guidance for the future evolution of requirements. Over time, we expect that items currently identified as “best practices” will instead be identified as a “baseline minimum requirement” as reporting performance improves, “the authors conclude.



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Putin sounds the methane alarm, under satellite surveillance and under pressure from the EU https://templodoconhecimento.com/putin-sounds-the-methane-alarm-under-satellite-surveillance-and-under-pressure-from-the-eu/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/putin-sounds-the-methane-alarm-under-satellite-surveillance-and-under-pressure-from-the-eu/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 16:29:09 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/putin-sounds-the-methane-alarm-under-satellite-surveillance-and-under-pressure-from-the-eu/ Russian president worried about warming impact of methane emissions, calling for research collaboration but making no political promises Vladimir Putin warned of the impact of methane gas on global warming and called for cooperation to reduce emissions, in a rare program of climate concern from the Russian president. Russia is the world’s largest exporter of […]]]>


Russian president worried about warming impact of methane emissions, calling for research collaboration but making no political promises

Vladimir Putin warned of the impact of methane gas on global warming and called for cooperation to reduce emissions, in a rare program of climate concern from the Russian president.

Russia is the world’s largest exporter of methane. Recent satellite data revealed that the frequency of methane plumes from two major Russian gas pipelines increased in 2020 despite a drop in gas exports. Gas can leak from infrastructure. It is also burned or deliberately released into the atmosphere when oil and gas companies do not consider it profitable or practical to transport and sell it.

Speaking at the climate summit of US leaders on Thursday, Putin laid out some key facts: “Methane accounts for 20% of anthropogenic emissions. The greenhouse effect of each tonne of methane is 25 to 28 times greater than one tonne of СО2. Experts estimate that if we could halve methane emissions over the next 30 years, global temperatures would drop 0.18 degrees by 2050. “

Putin continued: “In this context, it would be extremely important to develop broad and effective international cooperation in the calculation and monitoring of all polluting emissions into the atmosphere. We urge all interested countries to participate in joint research, invest in climate projects that can have a practical effect, and redouble their efforts to create low-carbon technologies to mitigate the consequences and reduce their impact. ” adapt to climate change. “

Saudi, US net zero Oil producers’ initiative arouses skepticism

While Putin’s figures match those used recently EU methane strategy documents, a major report under preparation from the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) is expected to show that faster reductions are achievable and desirable.

The report, produced jointly with the Climate and Clean Air Coalition and due for release next month, will estimate that reductions of 45% by 2030 can avert 0.3 ° C of global warming. The fossil fuel sector has the greatest potential for reducing emissions at low cost or for free, he will say.

Analysts were pleasantly surprised by Putin’s rhetoric. “This is a welcome change from the previous position of Russia which categorically denied having a methane problem,” energy analyst Poppy Kalesi told Climate Home News.

But they noted a lack of specific policy proposals from Putin to tackle the problem.

“Russia’s updated climate target last year was not an increase in ambition and fails to target emissions reductions below the level they should achieve under current policies.” , said Ryan Wilson of Climate Analytics. “There has been no indication to date of specific measures that would reflect Putin’s proposal to encourage foreign investment or seek international scientific collaboration.”

UK faces justice action on public finances for the Mozambique gas project

Putin may have felt the pressure from Russia’s biggest gas customer, the EU, and the awareness that new satellite technology leaves nowhere to hide.

According to the state-owned gas company Gazprom, “the Western European market (including Turkey) consumes the bulk of Russian exports”. In 2019, Russia exported nearly 200 billion cubic meters of gas to Europe (including the UK and Turkey).

The EU is consulting on new rules for monitoring, notification, verification, leak detection and remediation in the energy sector. These standards could cover imports as well as gas extracted in the EU.

the The EU consultation document says: “Most of the fossil fuels consumed in the EU are imported and 75 to 90% of the methane emissions associated with these fuels are emitted before reaching EU borders. In principle, obliging non-European entities supplying energy to the EU as well as EU actors would therefore considerably increase the benefits of such legislation, both in terms of improving information on emissions of energy. methane and their mitigation.

European investors and fossil fuel company Shell called the EU to set a methane performance standard to ensure it does not buy fuels from countries with lower standards.

In March, the EU and UNEP created the International Methane Emissions Observatory (IMEO) to monitor business emissions using business data, satellite technology and scientific studies.

Clean Air Task Force Director of Methane Jonathan Banks said: “Satellites are now starting to provide us with images and data for parts of the world that we have never really been able to look at – and that will only happen. ‘increase. Transparency will increase dramatically. We are no longer going to depend on what a company or a country says its methane emissions are. In the near future, we will be able to look at satellite data and know for sure what countries’ emissions are coming from their oil and gas sector. It certainly spurs some of Russia’s interest in it, because they see it coming.



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New chemical tool that sheds light on how proteins recognize and interact with each other – ScienceDaily https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-chemical-tool-that-sheds-light-on-how-proteins-recognize-and-interact-with-each-other-sciencedaily/ https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-chemical-tool-that-sheds-light-on-how-proteins-recognize-and-interact-with-each-other-sciencedaily/#respond Tue, 27 Apr 2021 16:15:07 +0000 https://templodoconhecimento.com/new-chemical-tool-that-sheds-light-on-how-proteins-recognize-and-interact-with-each-other-sciencedaily/ A research group led by Professor Xiang David LI of the Chemistry Research Division and Department of Chemistry at the University of Hong Kong has developed a new chemical tool to elucidate protein interaction networks in cells. This tool not only facilitates the identification of the interaction partners of a protein in the complex cellular […]]]>


A research group led by Professor Xiang David LI of the Chemistry Research Division and Department of Chemistry at the University of Hong Kong has developed a new chemical tool to elucidate protein interaction networks in cells. This tool not only facilitates the identification of the interaction partners of a protein in the complex cellular context, but also simultaneously allows the “visualization” of these protein-protein interactions. The results were recently published in the scientific journal Molecular cell.

In the human body, proteins interact with each other to cooperatively regulate essentially all biological processes ranging from gene expression and signal transduction to the immune response. As a result, deregulated protein interactions often lead to human diseases, such as cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. In modern biology, it is important to comprehensively understand protein interaction networks, which has implications in the diagnosis of disease and may facilitate the development of treatments.

To dissect complex protein networks, one must answer two questions: the “who” and the “how” of protein binding. The “who” refers to the identification of a protein’s interacting partners, while the “how” refers to the specific “binding regions” that mediate these interactions. Answering these questions is difficult, as protein interactions are often too unstable and too transient to be detected. To tackle this problem, Prof. Li’s group previously developed a series of tools to “trap” protein-protein interactions with chemical bonding. This is possible because these tools are equipped with a special light-activated “camera” – a group of diazirine that captures each binding partner of a protein when exposed to UV light. The interactions can then be examined and interpreted. Unfortunately, the “resolution” of this “camera” was relatively low, which means that key information about how proteins interact with each other has been lost. To this end, Prof. Li’s group has now designed a new tool (called ADdis-Cys) which has an improved “camera” to improve “resolution”. An alkyne handle installed next to the diazirine allows you to “zoom in” to clearly see the protein binding regions. Coupled with advanced mass spectrometry, ADdis-Cys is the first tool capable of simultaneously identifying the interacting partners of a protein and locating their binding regions.

In the published article, Prof. Li’s lab was able to comprehensively identify numerous protein interactions – some known and others recently discovered – that are important for the regulation of essential cellular processes such as DNA replication, gene transcription and repair of DNA damage. More importantly, Professor Li’s lab was able to use ADdis-Cys to reveal the binding regions mediating these protein interactions. This tool could lead to the development of chemical modulators that regulate protein interactions for the treatment of human diseases. As a research tool, ADdis-Cys will find wide-ranging applications in many fields of study, in particular in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases.

Source of the story:

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